How to prepare for a job that doesn’t exist

“What do you want to be when you grow up?”

If I had a dollar for every time I was asked this as a child, I wouldn’t need to plan my future at all.

I’m certain my response as a 5 year old would have been nothing remotely similar to- “I’m still torn between an SEO Analyst or UX Designer”.

Just a few of the many marketing jobs that did not exist 10 years ago.

In a short space of time, an explosion of digital marketing jobs has been created in response to the technological revolution.

Did you know that around 65% of the jobs that today’s learners will be doing in 2030 haven’t even been invented yet? How do we prepare for a future role that might not currently exist?

  1. Master Flexibility

The digital marketers of tomorrow will require an agile mindset and an ability to adapt to switching consumer dynamics. Self-learning is increasingly important in this rapidly evolving ecosystem.

Self-learning techniques to increase flexibility.

2. Gain Experience

I recently read a book that highlights that the more job roles a person has had, the greater experience and perspectives they bring. In a digital marketing future, it will be the breadth and depth of skills, and how transferable those skills are, that’s important.

3. Fill the relevant gaps

We’ve all got knowledge gaps. This isn’t always a bad thing. I’ll probably never need to fill my knowledge gap when it comes to physics. But if you’re an aspiring digital marketer who’s not quite sure how to turn a computer on, it’s probably best to work on that.

Click here to see ’21 jobs of the future in marketing’ proposed by Cognizant.

Can you see yourself filling any of these roles?

When refusal to innovate is fatal

Tales of misfortunate companies that have met their demise through the rise of predatory rivals are now a dime a dozen. As technology advances, a sheer refusal to innovate has seen much-loved companies and industries struggle to stay afloat. Where did it go wrong?

  1. Netflix didn’t sink Blockbuster. Unfavourable late fees did. This was the scourge of Blockbuster: return a movie, go to rent another, and find out that you owe $20 in late fees. This was how it made most of its revenue. Blockbuster’s business model required a conflict of interest with customers- so customers switched to Netflix as soon as it became available, without remorse.
Source: Thought Works
  1. Uber didn’t kill your local taxi firm– unreliability did. Riders are now able to hail a ride online instantly, with live tracking and accurate time frames. Convenience and time-saving aspects have streamlined ride services with the desires of customers at heart.
Uber App GIF by Product Hunt
Source: Giphy
  1. Airbnb isn’t taking over the hospitality industry– new customer experiences and pricing options are. Customers are demanding authentic lodging experiences- in locals real homes- at affordable prices.

“Airbnb Experiences immerse travellers in local communities, offering one-of-a-kind, handcrafted activities, led by local experts.”

By Airbnb
Source: Youtube

If these examples teach marketers anything, it’s that not being customer-centric or lacking innovation of experience can be fatal. Marketers need to invest and evolve alongside technology as demand-based power rises. In short: optimise your customer experience, before competitors get there first.

Can you think of any other examples where refusal to innovate has been fatal?