Digital Guide: SEO for Voice Search

With half of all online searches being done without lifting a finger, the landscape for digital marketers is changing. Clearly, searching has become more convenient than ever. For digital marketers, Siri, Alexa, and Google Home are shaping how we approach SEO.

If you’re trying to optimise for voice search using the same strategies as regular SEO, then you’ll want to stick around.

According to SEO Tribunal

3 SEO Strategies for Voice Search

  1. Be Concise

When someone asks a home assistant questions, they’re looking for a brief answer, and brief answers have higher chances of ranking for a voice search.

“Hey Alexa, what is SEO?”

Featured Google snippet when searching “what is SEO?”

For marketers, including a concise answer at the beginning of your content makes it easier for home assistants to find, read and rank.

2. Focus on local

It’s no secret that consumers use “near me” searches, but voice search users are increasingly searching for local results. Within the past year, 58% of consumers have found local businesses using voice search.

If you have a local store, you should optimise your content for local voice searches, use Google My Business and make sure you make answers easy to access online.

Source: Youtube

3. Natural language and long-tail key words

Consumers using voice search are using conversational language, and these queries are longer than regular text-based searches.

A few language features used in voice search.

So, for voice search optimisation, you too should focus on natural and conversational tone in your content. Try and put yourself in the consumer’s shoes, if you were looking for a certain answer, how would you phrase the question? This can help elevate your content in rankings.

Will voice search queries overtake text based? Let me know what you think in the comments below!

When refusal to innovate is fatal

Tales of misfortunate companies that have met their demise through the rise of predatory rivals are now a dime a dozen. As technology advances, a sheer refusal to innovate has seen much-loved companies and industries struggle to stay afloat. Where did it go wrong?

  1. Netflix didn’t sink Blockbuster. Unfavourable late fees did. This was the scourge of Blockbuster: return a movie, go to rent another, and find out that you owe $20 in late fees. This was how it made most of its revenue. Blockbuster’s business model required a conflict of interest with customers- so customers switched to Netflix as soon as it became available, without remorse.
Source: Thought Works
  1. Uber didn’t kill your local taxi firm– unreliability did. Riders are now able to hail a ride online instantly, with live tracking and accurate time frames. Convenience and time-saving aspects have streamlined ride services with the desires of customers at heart.
Uber App GIF by Product Hunt
Source: Giphy
  1. Airbnb isn’t taking over the hospitality industry– new customer experiences and pricing options are. Customers are demanding authentic lodging experiences- in locals real homes- at affordable prices.

“Airbnb Experiences immerse travellers in local communities, offering one-of-a-kind, handcrafted activities, led by local experts.”

By Airbnb
Source: Youtube

If these examples teach marketers anything, it’s that not being customer-centric or lacking innovation of experience can be fatal. Marketers need to invest and evolve alongside technology as demand-based power rises. In short: optimise your customer experience, before competitors get there first.

Can you think of any other examples where refusal to innovate has been fatal?